The Irish Flag Meaning and History

Perhaps one of the best-known symbols of Ireland is the Irish flag. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out why the flag of the Republic of Ireland is called the tricolorThe Irish flag consists of three different colors. The flag is a rectangle with three broad vertical stripes in the colors green, white, and orange.

Whenever the flag is flown, it is always flown such that the green stripe is closest to the flagpole. Each band is required to be of the same proportions, and the overall size of the Irish flag should be proportionately double its height. There is no question that each of the three colors on the Irish flag represents something significant.

Meaning of the Irish Flag Colors

What do the different colors on the Irish flag represent and what do they stand for? This is perhaps the topic that comes up the most frequently when people ask us about the Irish flag.

The color green is associated with Roman Catholics. On Saint Patrick’s Day, did you happen to notice how many people were wearing emerald or shamrock green? Orange is the color associated with Irish Presbyterians. Because of their allegiance to the protestant William of Orange, King William III of England, they are popularly referred to as “Orangemen,”, particularly on the Northern Irish side of the border. This moniker originated in Northern Ireland. The yearning for unity and peace between the two communities is represented by the single white stripe in the center of the flag. During this time when the Irish tricolor was first flown, the country was deeply divided between Catholics and Protestants.

A Wee Bit O Irish Flag History

The history of the flag that represents Ireland is a fascinating one. The present version of the Irish tricolor was conceived of and created by a collective of French ladies who were sympathetic to the Irish struggle.

They gave Thomas Francis Meagher, who was the head of the political Irish Nationalist Movement at the time, the tricolor in the year 1848. Meagher was the face of the movement at the time.  When he was presented with the flag, he is reputed to have made the following statement: “The white in the center signifies a lasting truce between Orange and Green and I trust that beneath its folds the hands of Irish Protestants and Irish Catholics may be clasped in generous and heroic brotherhood.”

When Meagher hoisted the tricolor in Waterford, it proudly fluttered for eight days and nights until it was brought down by the British. Meagher was responsible for hanging the flag.

The uprisings that occurred across Europe in 1848 served as an inspiration for Meagher and the other members of the Young Irelanders. In April of 1848, a group of them went to France to offer their congratulations to the revolutionaries there on the successful toppling of King Louis Philippe I. There, Meagher was given a tricolor Irish flag that had been fashioned out of French silk as a gift.

The Irish Flag did not appear in Dublin until Gearóid O’Sullivan raised the tricolor for the first time at Dublin’s General Post Office in 1916, during the Easter Rebellion. Prior to that, the flag had not been flown there since 1848.

It encapsulated the spirit of the revolutionary cause, and from that point on, the tricolor was considered to be the flag of the Republic of Ireland or Sinn Féin. Even though the flag of Ireland was flown proudly across the land from that point forward, it wasn’t until 1937 that it was given constitutional recognition as Ireland’s official national flag.

The official name for the flag that flies over Ireland.

Bratach na hÉireann is the Irish term for the tricolor flag and ensign, “bratach” being the Irish word for flag. This name was given to the flag and ensign by the Irish.

What does it mean when you see the Irish flag?

The following is the simple and clear interpretation of the Irish flag color meaning:

  • Green: Roman Catholics are represented by the color green.
  • White: The color white stands for the harmony and concord that both of these parties are hoping to achieve.
  • Orange: Orange is the color that signifies the Irish Protestants.

Great Irish Pubs of Ireland

Are you planning a trip this year to Ireland? If so you will definitely want to check out this list of must-see Irish pubs in Ireland. It is imperative that you pay a visit to these fabulous Irish pubs and bars at least once in your lifetime in order to experience traditional Irish music, the warmth of Irish hospitality, Irish beers, and much more.

Seáns Bar in Athlone, County Westmeath, which was built in the 10th century, has the distinction of “oldest bar in Ireland.” Irish pubs have been around for close to a millennium, making it the clear frontrunner for the title of “oldest pub in Ireland.” The Brazen Head, located in Dublin City, is recognized as the “oldest bar in Dublin” due to its foundation in the year 1198. With that being said we have compiled a short list of a few other Irish pubs with think are worth seeing while traveling Ireland.

Famous Irish Pubs:

O’Connor’s Famous Pub, Co. Galway

O’Connor’s Famous Pub is located in County Galway and is the ideal setting for any Galway Girl. O’Connor’s Bar, which is located in the picturesque seaside location of Salthill, asserts that it was Ireland’s first singing bar. That might be argued either way, but thanks to Ed Sheeran, it is without a doubt the most popular pub in all of Ireland.

O’Connors makes an appearance in the music video that Ed Sheeran created for his smash single “Galway Girl,” which also features the actress Saoirse Ronan. If you are interested in going to O’Connor’s, you should know that it is a TRUE Irish bar, which means that it does not have any televisions, does not sell any food, and only opens at night. There is no way you should skip a night spent here.

Matt Molloy’s, Co. Mayo

A leader in both drink and music, Matt Molloy’s may be found in County Mayo. Where can you hear the greatest traditional Irish music performed live seven nights a week? That would be the Irish pub Matt Molloy in Westport.

The proprietor of this bar is also a member of the internationally acclaimed traditional Irish music group The Chieftains. The relationship to the great Irish band The Chieftains is the most effective form of advertising for the establishment. It is one of the most famous Irish pubs and bars in all of Ireland due to the wonderful nights filled with music and craic that can be enjoyed at this establishment. If you are in Westport we definitely recommend having a pint at Matt Molloy’s Pub. In a word, if you want to enjoy a night filled with craic and music in a lively bar, you should put Matt Molloy’s on your list of potential destinations.

Temple Bar in Dublin

The Temple Bar, Co. Dublin

Temple Bar, which is located in County Dublin, can be found smack dab in the middle of Dublin’s most well-known bar area. Temple Bar is a name that is recognized in many parts of the world, and you will be happy to learn that there is, in fact, a Temple Bar.

The Temple Bar is famous all throughout Ireland and is known for being the ideal location to unwind with a pint. It is impossible to adequately describe the vibe both inside and outside of the pub; it is simply something that one needs to feel for themselves. This year, you really must put a trip to The Temple Bar on your must-do list.

Tigh Neachtain, Galway City

Tigh Neachtain, which is located on the corner of Cross Street and has been selling pints of beer since 1894, is a popular establishment in Galway for both its cuisine and its drink. Try to get a spot inside for one of their live music sessions, or arrive early to have a better chance of getting a table outside in their sunny drinking area. If you are able to secure a seat inside, there is a chance that you will never want to leave. Since the bar is a huge supporter of music and art (it is located in Galway, after all), you can anticipate a lot of cultural events occurring around the time of the Galway Arts Festival in July.

The Crown Liquor Saloon, Co. Antrim

One of the most well-known pubs and bars in all of Ireland is located in the county of Antrim and is called The Crown Liquor SaloonThe Crown, which can be situated in the middle of Belfast city, was formerly thought of as the most powerful Victorian gin palace in the whole country. It still has many of the characteristics that were typical of the Victorian era, such as gas lighting, intricate wood carving, and polished brass. This bar is not only difficult to miss, but also not one you want to miss out on.

The Folk House, Co. Cork

The Folk House in Kinsale, which is located in the county of Cork, is a traditional Irish tavern. Due to its laid-back ambiance, blazing open fireplace, and exposed stone walls, the Folk House in Kinsale is the epitome of a traditional Irish bar in its purest form.  Additionally, the bar offers a wide variety of beers and whiskeys for patrons to pick from.

Fun Facts About Irish Pubs:

Why were bars originally called public houses?

A picture that illustrates the history of pubs in Ireland. It wasn’t until the latter half of the 17th century that the phrase public house was coined. Prior to that time, “alehouses,” “taverns,” and “inns” were the terms that were used to refer to establishments that were accessible to the general public.

Why do people associate Ireland with pubs?

The genuine atmosphere and friendly atmosphere of Irish pubs have contributed to their widespread popularity. People rave about how much fun the Authentic Irish Pub is, how inviting the staff is, and how much they want to be a part of the community there.

What are the origins of the Irish pub?

The Romans are responsible for the establishment of most aspects of life in the western world, including the bar. As the Roman Empire spread into Celtic Europe, its soldiers, traders, and colonists were able to travel more easily because of the construction of roads. Approximately every 20 miles or so along these highways, there would be a “Tabernae”…or “Tavern.”

What to Know When Visiting an Irish Pub …

One thing is for certain is that the traditional watering hole known as the Irish Pub plays a significant role in Irish civil society. Many of our most accomplished authors got their start in Irish pubs. All of these authors, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Oscar Wilde, and Brendan Behan, produced short tales in which the Irish pub served as the primary setting. In Ireland’s pubs, many of the world’s greatest authors have gone in quest of new ideas.

It is customary for the person who invites you to an Irish bar to pay for the first round of drinks upon entering the establishment. However, in order to maintain the spirit of the occasion, you should place the following order before the other customers have finished their beverages. The Irish Pub in Ireland is, and always has been, the most popular destination for vacationers.

The Book of Kells: Everything You Need to Know

Ireland’s Republic of Ireland’s County Meath has the little town of Kells. The four New Testament gospels are included in the Book of Kells, also known as the Book of Columba, along with additional manuscripts.

The book’s uniqueness comes from the fact that it is an illuminated manuscript with intricate graphics and pictures that are thought to have been created around the year 800 AD.

Although it is not Irish writing, the illuminated manuscript known as the Book of Kells is recognized as a priceless piece of Irish history and may be found in Dublin, Ireland’s Trinity College Library.

ORIGIN OF THE ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT CALLED THE BOOK OF KELLS

While it is generally agreed that the monks of St. Columba were responsible for producing the Book of Kells, there is great disagreement as to where exactly they did it. It is thought that it was written by Celtic monks at the monastery’s scriptorium on the island of Iona, part of the Mull chain in western Scotland. Saint Columcille of Donegal established this monastery.

The Lindisfarne Gospels were written in Iona around 700 AD, and the Book of Kells’ design resembles those works, suggesting that Iona rather than Kells was where it was written. Viking invasions of coastal monasteries were a possibility around the start of the ninth century. The majority of this book is said to have been written on Iona and carried back to the Abbey of Kells for preservation.

The relics of Columcille have reportedly transported to Kells from his home County Donegal in the year 1090 AD, according to the Annals of Tigernach, another ancient Irish chronicle.

Two gospels were found among these artifacts, one of which was presumably the Book of Kells. The Book of Durrow is supposed to have been the second gospel. The church at Kells was destroyed in 1641 as a result of an Irish uprising. The English governor of Kells sent the book to Dublin for storage sometime around 1653.

A few years later, Henry Jones, a former soldier in Cromwell’s army, is said to have helped bring the Book of Kells to Trinity CollegeThe Long Room of the Old Library at Trinity College is where you may discover this masterpiece today in Dublin, Ireland. The 340 folios or leaves, each made of calfskin vellum, are bound together in a book that is around thirteen inches broad and ten inches thick. Although this might look substantial, the original was significantly bigger. But over time, thirty folios were lost, and even the ones that were still there had to be reduced for upkeep and rebinding.

Why Was the Book of Kells Created?

The book’s purpose was more ceremonial than practical, despite binding the gospels’ material together. It wasn’t intended to be read during mass. The creation and presentation of the material within the book itself are one of the main justifications for this notion. The text itself is haphazardly scrawled and scattered throughout the pages, in contrast to the carefully thought out and executed images and illustrations.

There is word and paragraph duplication, the omission of crucial phrases, and a lack of attempt to fix these serious mistakes. This book was admired for its decorations and exquisite pictures, not for its content.

The book’s authors appear to prefer the artwork and illustrations above the readings. In a nutshell, the appearance and aesthetics of the book took precedence over its practical utility.

What is the Vulgate?

The fourth-century Latin Vulgate is a translation of the Bible. According to legend, the gospels of the new testament were transferred directly from the Vulgate into the Book of Kells. However, as was already said, the scribes’ compositions were erratic and haphazard. There is the suggestion that they relied on their own memory of what they had previously read rather than copying their lines verbatim from the Vulgate.

The book has additional material in addition to the text, and each page of prose is accompanied by an image. These images feature meticulous details and vivid hues such, among others, purple, pink, green, and yellow.

The Book has Irish-Celtic themes and initials that were influenced by the Hiberno-Saxon style of the 7th century. Along with this, there is also the Anglo-Saxon custom of vibrant color and upbeat compositions. What distinguishes the book are its intricate designs and exquisite craftsmanship.

The illuminations are also another striking element of the book. They span 10 full pages and show small images of evangelical symbols. Some of these portrayals have survived.

The canon tables are given their own elaborately decorated pages in the Book of Kells, which may be found in Ireland. You will discover the emblems that represent each of the four evangelists, with Matthew being shown as a Man, Mark being represented by the Lion, Luke being linked to the Calf, and John being given the Eagle as his emblem.

Additionally discovered are the introductory passages of each of the Gospels. Breves causae are the names given to these condensed versions of the gospel tales. The Vulgate, which was finished by Saint Jerome in 384 AD, serves as the basis for this work, which is written in Latin and is dedicated to the four Gospels. There is also a picture of Christ, in addition to creative depictions of the Virgin Mary and the Christ Child.

The Book of Kells is Written on Vellum

Vellum, which was made from the skins of around 185 animals, was used rather than paper for the writing in the Book of Kells. The monks who lived in Ireland’s monasteries managed large herds of cattle not just to supply milk and food for themselves, but also as a source of vellum, which was the principal writing medium that the monks used. Following the hand stitching that was used to bind the vellum pages together, a protective cover was created out of either leather or wood.

The text of the book is written in an italicized script that is referred to as “insular majuscule.” The intricate knotwork and links that can be found in the images are well-known for the complexity of their design and the attention to detail that went into creating them. It is likely that the book was initially kept in a shrine, which is a jewel-encrusted casing made of gold that is used to contain treasures. Around the year 1000 A.D., the volumes were taken by thieves. It had been buried beneath the ground when it was discovered, but the priceless holder it had been holding was never found.

During the nineteenth century, the book went through a process called “rebinding,” during which the page margins were, regrettably, trimmed and gilded. In 1953, the book underwent yet another rebinding, which resulted in the creation of four distinct volumes. This was done with the intention of assisting in the preservation of its magnificent and rare pages. Two of the four volumes are currently on exhibit at Trinity College in Dublin, where they will remain there indefinitely. The first book has pages of text, whereas the second volume is solely dedicated to displaying illustrations on its pages.

The Book of Kells is an Irish Treasure

The Book of Kells was the most valuable artifact in all of medieval Europe. The Book of Kells is a stunning example of Irish artwork and is considered to be a national treasure. Each year, hundreds of people travel to the Trinity College Library in Dublin in the hope of catching a sight of the two volumes that are kept on exhibit there.

St. Brigid Blessings and Prayers

Saint Brigid’s cross made from straw stuck in window and blessed the house and protected it from fire and evil. Concept: religion, irish, traditional

A Traditional St. Brigid Blessing

Our wonderful Brigid’s Crosses were inspired by this beautiful heritage, imitating the delicate woven pattern of rushes in precious metals such as silver and gold. Also known as Bride, Bridget of Ireland, Bride of the Isles, and Mary of the Gael, she now reigns as one of the most recognized saints in Ireland.

May the blessing of God and the Trinity be on this cross and where it sits, and on everyone who looks at it,” is a customary blessing for St. Brigid Cross.

About the Brigid’s Cross

Brigid’s cross, like the shamrock and the harp, is a wonderful Irish symbol that may be traced back to Celtic folklore. The cross is weaved from left to right, following the position of the sun, on January 31st, the eve of St. Brigid’s day. It features a layered square in the middle and four arms extending out from it, each knotted at the ends.

St. Brigid’s Feast Day

St. Brigid’s Day is February 1st and traditionally the start of Spring in Ireland.

Prayer to St. Brigid

Dear St. Brigid, brilliant star of sanctity in the early days of our Irish faith and love for the omnipotent God Who has never forsaken us, we look up to you now in earnest, hopeful prayer. By your glorious sacrifice of earthly riches, joys and affections obtain for us grace to “seek first the Kingdom of God and His justice” with constant trust in His fatherly care. By your life of laborious charity to the poor, the sick, the many seekers for light and comfort, obtain for us grace to be God’s helpers to the utmost of our power during our stay on earth, looking forward, as you did, to our life with Him during eternity. By the sanctified peace of your death-bed, obtain for us that we may receive the fullness of pardon and peace when the hour comes that will summon us to the judgment seat of our just and most merciful Lord. Amen.

Published by The Irish Jewelry Company

We at The Irish Jewelry Company take pride in making the Irish gift giving experience modern and convenient. The Irish Jewelry Company celebrates their Celtic heritage and a love of Ireland through original Irish Jewelry design. Their beautiful Irish jewelry is steeped in Celtic symbolism and rich in Irish tradition. View all posts by The Irish Jewelry Company

Announcing The Launch of The Irish Jewelry Company New Website

The Irish Jewelry Company New Website

TheIrishJewelryCompany.com is excited to announce the launch of their newly design, responsive, user friendly luxurious new website. After seven months of unforeseen obstacles, hard work and dedication the new website has successfully launched to the approval of their loyal customer.

Rockville Centre, NY October 6th, 2021 – The Irish Jewelry Company is excited to announce the launch of their newly designed website. Visit us at TheIrishJewelryCompany.com. After seven months of hard work and perseverance, the official new website has launched. The new websites look is luxurious, and the site is faster, easier to navigate, and more user-friendly.

As an online Irish jewelry design leader, it is important for us to showcase new styles, services, and trends in a pleasing way quickly to our loyal customer and prospective customers. The new site endeavors to provide our customers with the most beautiful jewelry designs at the highest quality with the best customer service possible.  

“Our goal with this new website is to provide our customers a modern site with an easier way to navigate our collections based on their own choice with seamless checkout.” Says owner Jennifer Derrig. “The Irish Jewelry Company’s new visually appealing website is designed for company growth and provides faster page loading speeding, and greater content with our Blog as well as improved website navigation in order to comply with the new google core update.”

Amongst the new site features is an interactive catalog lookbook and integrated social media buttons for Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Pinterest to foster improved social sharing for customers. Customers can now enjoy reading The Irish Jewelry Company Blog directly on the website. Regular posting of interesting educational blog content pertaining to Irish jewelry, Irish wedding traditions and Irish culture along with other with helpful information such as company announcements and customer testimonials in the Blog will happen on a weekly base. When existing customers login in while shopping they can also enjoy new instant checkout. Customers can also sign up for emails and as well as SMS notifications.  New SMS features is a text messaging service that will allow us to instantly contact customers regarding their order status, store promotions, and new products. In addition, as part of the new site launch The Irish Jewelry Company will be offering free stand shipping on all orders over $150.


To view the new website, visit https://THEIRISHJEWELRYCOMPANY.com.

Brief History of Gold Jewelry

Gold and gold jewelry has been a treasured commodity throughout ancient history. The first historical evidence of gold jewelry in a society occurred in ancient Egypt around 3,000 B.C. Gold was a highly valued metal that was easy to work with in its purest form. Gold was treasured in Egyptian mythology. Gold and gold jewelry was highly valued by pharaohs and Egyptian temple priests. So important, and highly treasured that the capstones on the Pyramids of Giza were made of solid gold.

Ancient Greeks and Gold

Later on in ancient history, the Greeks saw gold as a symbol of social status and as a form of glory amongst the immortal gods and demigods. The average Greek used gold to reflect wealth wealth and as currency.

Gold Fun Fact

The Olympics tradition of giving gold medals to the victors began during the modern Olympics and actually has very little to do with ancient Greek tradition.

Celtic Gold Jewelry History and Origins

From what historians can discern the Celts began working with gold in the early bronze age. They started working in sheet gold, creating sun-discs and crescentic gold collars called lunulae.

Around 1200 BC new gold working techniques were developed. During this time a great variety of torcs including torc bracelets were made by twisting bars or strips of gold.

It is believed around 1200 BC the Celts began to develop new gold working techniques. It is thought that during this time many of the Celtic torcs discovered were made by simply twisting bars of pure gold or strips of pure gold.

Around 900 BC – the Late Bronze Age – and the Celtic jewelry metal work of this period consisted of two main types. Celtic Jewelry pieces including Celtic bracelets and Celtic brooches used as fasten their cloaks, in dramatic contrast to previous sheet gold collars and ear-spools.

What is Pure Gold?

According to the World Gold Council “‘Caratage’ is the measurement of purity of gold alloyed with other metals. 24 carat is pure gold with no other metals. Lower caratages contain less gold; 18 carat gold contains 75 per cent gold and 25 per cent other metals, often copper or silver.”

What is Karat Gold?

Karat Gold refers to a standardized industry unit of measurement regarding the percentages of metal alloy added to pure to to either strengthen it, decrease gold caratage to reduce costs or change it’s color.

Connect with the Best Online Irish Jeweler: The Irish Jewelry Company

Started by an Irish American husband-and-wife team in 2006, with a combined 50 years of experience in the jewelry industry. They are a family owned and operated business. The Irish Jewelry Company is an award-winning business and their Irish jewelry is sold worldwide online.

Jeweler crafting jewelry on his workbench

From modest beginnings starting in the basement of their family home this dynamic husband and wide duo has continued to grow their brand The Irish Jewelry Company designing beautiful exclusive Irish jewelry.  With awards for jewelry design and in business they have successfully combine their love of Ireland, their passion for jewelry and knowledge of manufacturing to create their unique and high-quality Irish jewelry in a brilliant working relationship that ships order for their jewelry daily to delighted customers around the world.

The Irish Jewelry Company

Jennifer, Owner and Jewelry designer said “We created this company, fulfilling a lifelong dream of honoring our families’ Irish heritage through our combined talents and experience in the jewelry industry. My husband, Andrew Derrig provides the expertise in manufacturing, research & development sourcing, and licensing that is the key to our company’s continued success. Although we are based in the United States, we frequently visit our family and our family home in County Mayo, Ireland and travel to Europe with our kids discovering new product and spotting new trends.”  

Each piece of jewelry from The Irish Jewelry Company is meticulously designed by Jennifer who was classically trained as a jewelry designer at the prestigious school for art and design, the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York.

The Irish Jewelry Company has had enormous success in their notable collection of exclusive designs such as the Celtic Mothers Knot, their Mothers Claddagh, the Sisters Knot, and their beautiful selection of traditional and unique Claddagh Ring designs all available online just to name a few.  

The Claddagh Ring is an old Irish ring with two hands holding a heart, surmounted by a crown. According to Irish heritage, the claddagh symbolizes love, loyalty and friendship. The hands represent ‘friendship’, the heart represents ‘love’, and the crown represents ‘loyalty’.

Claddagh Rings are so popular they have been worn by famous royal wearers such as Princess Grace of Monaco and Queen Victoria. Claddagh Rings have even been presented to two US presidents as gifts when they visited Ireland. John F. Kennedy and his wife Jackie received theirs in 1963. The rings were to honor his Irish roots. Ronald Reagan received his ring in 1984 from the people of Galway.

The Irish Jewelry Company is busy year-round shipping Irish gifts to customers around the world. Irish gift giving holidays like Valentine’s Day, St Patrick’s Day, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day and Christmas are especially busy order times.      

You can find out more about The Irish Jewelry Company at www.TheIrishJewelryCompany.com , on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.  

Friendship, Love and Loyalty: The Claddagh Ring’s Romantic Symbolism

Everyone knows that Galway, Ireland is the birthplace of the Claddagh Ring. However not everyone knows that this romantic symbol of Irish love originated first with the Romans.  

Claddagh Rings are world renowned, and are worn by both men and women, single or taken. Irish Claddagh rings are named for the ancient fishing village of Claddagh, near Galway, Ireland, dating back to the 17th century. The Claddagh ring in Irish is fáinne Chladaigh and is a traditional Irish ring which represents love, loyalty, and friendship. The hands represent friendship, the heart represents love, and the crown represents loyalty. The Irish Cladddagh ring, as currently known, was first produced in the 17th century.

The design for the claddagh ring originated with the Roman Empire during the Renaissance period.  The Claddagh ring is really a fede ring and have a long history dating back to Roman times. The name “fede” derives from the Italian phrase mani in fede meaning loosely “hands joined in faith” or “hands joined in loyalty”. The clasped hands were viewed as promise ring used as an engagement ring or wedding ring in medieval and Renaissance Europe. The  Irish Claddagh ring is a version of the fede ring has roots deeply seeded in long standing Irish tradition.

Long ago it was traditional in Ireland for mothers and grandmothers to pass down claddagh rings to their daughters and granddaughters. Today Irish Claddagh Rings are traditional given by a loved one or partner as a symbol of love, loyalty, and friendship. These days claddagh rings are given and worn for a variety of reasons:

Claddagh Engagement Rings and Promise

You show your commitment to love your partner with a Claddagh Engagement Ring or promise ring. Traditionally a claddagh engagement ring is worn on the left hand with the heart facing outward to symbolize engagement and pointed inward for marriage. Claddagh engagement rings have proclaiming love, loyalty and friendship for centuries. Truly any Irish Claddagh Ring can be worn as an Irish Promise Ring or Claddagh Engagement Ring.

Friendship and Sisterhood

Sisters and best friends can give each other a claddagh as a symbol of the great friendship, their loyalty y to each and the love that binds them in eternal friendship.

A Symbol of Irish Pride  

Claddagh are often worn by people of Irish heritage as a symbol of Irish pride and to show a genuine love of Ireland. You probably know Irish superstition says it is bad luck to purchase a Claddagh ring for yourself. Everyone knows Irish tradition says a Claddagh Ring must be given as a token of love or received as a gift. But to heck with Irish superstition.

Today’s choices in Claddagh rings and Claddagh Jewelry

Known the worldwide as a sign of love the claddagh symbol has inspired a variety of jewelry designs. The claddagh design can be found in Claddagh inspired bracelets, claddagh earrings, and claddagh necklaces.  So, whether you choice a claddagh necklace or claddagh ring for the special someone you are almost guaranteed they with treasure the symbolic token of love forever.

So, are you ready to shop for that Claddagh Ring? See Claddagh rings and Claddagh Jewelry at The Irish Jewelry Company  

The Day Of The Wren Known as St Stephen’s Day

Straw Boys

One of Ireland’s unique and darker traditions, celebrated on December 26th, relates to killing a small bird in revenge for betraying St Stephen.
“Hunting the Wren” is an Irish tradition that is believed to pre-date Christian times. It sounds pretty cruel, where basically the tiny bird is captured, killed and tied to a pole. Local musicians and dancers would then dress in garish disguises and go house to house collecting money, food and drink for a party. Woe betide the house that did not donate to the cause – the wren could be buried outside their door which would bring 12 months of bad luck!

St Stephen


King of the Birds or Traitor of Saints??
The wren is considered the ‘King of the Birds’ and is also associated with the old year. It was said that capturing the bird alive would herald in a new and prosperous year. As the king of the birds the wren occupied a prominent position in the druidic pagan religion. Sailors and fishermen believed that those who possessed a wren feather would never be shipwrecked.

Legend has it that the wren was a small feathered traitor, but legend cannot agree if this dubious reputation was earned by betraying a saint’s hiding place, ruining a secret attack by Irish warriors or by being a fairy seductress – all intriguing in their own right.
One version of the story tells that St Stephen was hiding in a bush from his enemies, only for his hiding to be revealed by the chattering of a wren. Another maintains that in the 700s during the Viking troubles, when Irish warriors crept up on the Danes to attack, a little wren beat out a warning by picking crumbs from the drum held by a sleeping Viking. And lastly, there was a fairy woman called Cliona was in the habit of luring local men to a watery grave. She had the power to turn herself into, you’ve guessed it, a wren.

the wren

An Irish St. Stephen’s Day Tradition
The feast of St. Stephen, who was the first Christian martyr, is celebrated on December 26th. Connecting the Wren Boys ritual (Lá an Dreoilín) as the day when the traitor wren betrayed St. Stephen is a good example of how Ireland’s pagan traditions were merged with Christianity (it also happened with St Brigid)

The Wren, the Wren the king of all birds,
St. Stephens’s day, he was caught in the furze.
Although he is little, his honour is great,
Rise up, kind sir, and give us a trate.

We followed this Wren ten miles or more
Through hedges and ditches and heaps of snow,
We up with our wattles and gave him a fall
And brought him here to show you all.

For we are the boys that came your way
To bury the Wren on Saint Stephens’s Day,
So up with the kettle and down with the pan!
Give us some help for to bury the Wren!

Modern Revival
Nowadays, a more humane Wren Boys is still practiced in mainly rural areas, they don’t kill the wren anymore, thank goodness. The tradition consists of “hunting” a fake wren, and putting it on top of a decorated pole. Crowds of mummers or straw boys celebrate the wren by dressing up in masks, straw suits and colorful motley clothing and, accompanied by céilí music bands, parade through the towns and villages. A celebration is still held around the decorated pole and the money that is collected from the townspeople is now donated to a school or charity.

Cautionary word of warning to all wrens – a wren’s feather is still thought to bring good luck, so maybe lie low around Christmas time…

Shop Irish at The Irish Jewelry Company and learn more about Irish traditions.

Brilliant Irish Gifts for any Occasion

Discover the best Irish Gifts and Celtic gifts online. Shopping for authentic, creative Irish gifts, and unique Irish gifts from Ireland online is getting easier these days.  Ireland, also known as the Emerald Isleis an island in the North Atlantic, part of the European Union that is known for its age-old Irish traditions, beautiful green landscapes, and triumphant people. The culture of Ireland is known for its ancient folklore and traditions steeped in Celtic heritage, as well as its Celtic music, Gaelic language, Celtic art, Irish Jewelry, Celtic Jewelry, and food. 

What is a traditional Irish wedding gift?

In Irish weddings, the couple rings a bell together after reciting their vows. Tradition states that every newlywed couple should receive a Make-Up Bell as a gift. … The bell chime is said to remind the married couple of their wedding vows and urges them to kiss and make up.

What do you buy an Irish woman?

When shopping for a lovely lady of Irish heritage be sure to choose the proper Irish gift for the right occasion.  One thing is for certain you can never go wrong with a beautiful piece of Irish Jewelry.

What is Irish jewelry?

Irish jewelry and Celtic jewelry are unique pieces of jewelry steeped in Irish tradition and heritage. The Irish have a proud tradition of Irish jewelry making. Often Irish jewelry symbols come from unique symbols of Irish and Celtic culture. Symbols like the shamrock, Celtic knots, Celtic Crosses and the harp to the wonderful Claddagh ring which has gained fame around the world.

What is the meaning of claddagh rings?

So what do claddagh rings mean? Irish or not, if you want to give a token of your friendship, love and loyalty that has meaning, the Claddagh rings may be the choice for you. Claddagh rings, are often mistakenly spelt Clatter Ring or Clodagh Ring, like it sounds (Irish: fáinne Chladaigh) is a traditional Irish ring. The Claddagh ring means eternal love, loyalty, and friendship. Claddagh rings consists of a heart with a crown held by two hands symbolizing love, loyalty and friendship. Claddagh Rings have become a world-renowned symbol of love and make the perfect Irish gift for that special someone.

What is Celtic Knot Jewelry?

Celtic Knots are a popular Celtic symbol but there are many types of Celtic KnotsCeltic knots are like circles and loops interwoven with no beginning or end. A symbol of eternity and the cycle of life. Celtic symbols are widely popular in Celtic Tattoos and in Celtic Knot JewelryCeltic symbols have a variety of Celtic Knot meanings representing family, strength, protection, love and more.

The Legend of the Celtic Cross

Have you heard about the legend of the Celtic Cross? Irish folklore says Saint Patrick introduced the Celtic cross to the Celts when he was trying to educate and possible convert the pagan Irish hopefully to Christianity. The pagan Celts were said to worship the sun. Saint Patrick according to legend combined the image of the Christian cross with the circular to represent the sun to associate circle of light with the Christian cross as one in the same.

Another less popular story suggests that, by St. Patrick laying the symbol of the cross over the symbol of the sun he was showing them that Christ was a more powerful force then the sun god.

A piece of Celtic cross jewelry is the perfect Irish gift to symbolize one’s faith and heritage.

What is a shamrock?

Shamrock necklaces are inspired by Ireland’s national symbol the three-leaf clover known as the shamrock and not to be confused with the four-leaf clover. Get the Luck of the Irish with a traditional shamrock pendant as a gift! The shamrock is believed to bring good luck. and not just to the Irish. The shamrock forms a triad and the Celts believed three was a mystical number. Saint Patrick used the shamrock to explain the holy Trinity to the Celts. If good things come in threes, then a silver 3-leafed shamrock pendant is a good thing and a great Irish gift for anyone needing a little luck.

Timeless Irish Jewelry for those who Love Ireland and Irish Heritage.

At The Irish Jewelry Company we are proud of this Irish heritage. At The Irish Jewelry Company you will find an exclusive designer collection of Irish jewelry and Celtic jewelry like the traditional Celtic knot and claddagh designs, in silver and gold. As jewelry designers we make sure every piece of Irish jewelry is authentic in detail and beautifully crafted.