A Guide To 12 Infamous Celtic Gods And Goddesses

The ancient Celtic mythology included more than 400 Celtic gods and goddesses, and their roles ranged from presiding over rivers to leading armies into battle. Worship of the Celtic gods was not widespread throughout Europe throughout the Iron Age, with the possible exception of Lugh. Instead, it was often confined to only a few provinces or a particular area.

Who are some of the most well-known gods and goddesses from Celtic mythology?

The legends that accompany each god and goddess of Celtic mythology are rich and varied, and often include tales of conflict, tragedy, and the exercise of supernatural or magical abilities.

Dagda – the good god…

Dagda is considered to be among the ‘good’ gods of Celtic folklore. He plays a significant role in Celtic mythology as a father figure. He is the father of Aengus, Bodb Derg, Cermait, Midir, and Brigit. His other children’s names are Midir and Brigit. In ancient times, Dagda presided over the powerful Tuatha Dé Danann clan of Celtic gods, which was said to travel all throughout the island of Ireland.

It is reported that Dagda possessed a number of potent weapons, one of which is a massive club that could kill ten people with a single strike. It also has the ability to bring the dead back to life. In addition, he possessed a cauldron that could be used to produce food and a harp that could be used to call the changing of the seasons. One of Dagda’s numerous lovers was the powerful Morrigan, the Celtic goddess of battle and fate. Dagda also had many more lovers.

Brigid – the enlightened one

There are still many people in Ireland who celebrate Saint Brigid’s Day. St. Brigid’s Day, also known as Imbolc, is observed beginning in the evening of February 1 and continuing through the evening of February 2. It is considered to be the first day of spring.

As a result, Brigid is recognized as one of the most popular Celtic goddesses in modern-day Ireland. Brigid is revered as the goddess of life, as well as springtime and fertility. She is also known as a skilled healer and poet. Brigid was a Celtic goddess who presided over the arts of poetry and prophecy, as well as healing, agriculture, and the element of fire. In reality, she was a member of the Tuatha de Danann and her father was Dagda.

It is thought that Brigid had a few domesticated animals at her home, including sheep, cats, and oxen among other creatures. Brigid was famous for three different facets of her life: as a poet, a healer, and a blacksmith. Some people think that Brigid was actually three gods in one.

Danu – the mother goddess…

Danu is one of the first legendary entities that have been associated with Ireland. This Celtic Goddess is typically shown as a stunning lady, and she is frequently linked to aspects of the natural world.

Danu is revered by her people as the embodiment of the holy mother (the tribe of Celtic Gods). Additionally, she embodies concepts related to rebirth, enlightenment, the afterlife, and wealth. Concerning the historical aspect of the situation, Danu was not only an important Celtic God in Ireland; her fame won her respect in Britain as well as in other parts of the world.

Lugh – a warrior god

In the Mythology of the Celts, this sun god of all trades and arts was indeed a prominent deity among the Celtic gods and goddesses, despite the fact that God Lugh was only sometimes referenced in inscriptions. Lugh was frequently depicted with his magic spear, Gae Assail, as well as his helmet and armor. He was also associated with ravens and thunderstorms. He was a fierce fighter who was responsible for the death of the one-eyed chief of the Formorii, the legendary Balor. One of the most celebrated heroes in Irish mythology was a warrior named Cuchulainn, and Lugh is said to have been his godfather, according to the tradition.

Badb – the Celtic Goddess of enlightenment…

Badb, the Celtic Goddess, was also thought to be a supernatural monster. She was Ernmas’ daughter and was revered by the Celts. According to Celtic eschatology, Badb is the one who will bring about the destruction of the world. According to the tale, she had the ability to foretell the destruction of the gods as well as the Great Famine that occurred in the 19th century. In Celtic mythology, the word “Crow” refers to Badb, who was also a goddess and whose name means “Crow.” Badb was the patroness of illumination, inspiration, life, and knowledge.

The Morrigan – the goddess of war

Morrigan, also known as the “Phantom Queen,” is revered as a potent female divinity who is linked with both the afterlife and the course of one’s life. The Morrigan is depicted in stories as both a singular being and a celestial triad consisting of three sisters who had the ability to morph into shrieking crows. The sight of the Morrigan was frequently seen as a warning that a soldier’s brutal end was near. As a result, the banshee figure from Irish legend is connected to her in some way.

The Morrigan is not only renowned as the Phantom Queen in Celtic mythology but she is also referred to as the “Goddess of War” and the “Queen of Demons.” According to the myth, she appeared on the battlefield in the appearance of a crow or a raven and watched over the action. The Morrigan was also capable of predicting who would emerge victorious from the conflict. She materialized in front of Cuchulainn, but he was unable to recognize her at first glance. Shortly after, C Chulainn was killed in a conflict. After he passed away, the Morrigan took the appearance of a bird and perched itself on his shoulder.

Cu Chulainn – the champion of Ulster

C Chulainn was the legendary hero of the Ulster Cycle in Irish mythology. He was also known by his original name, Setanta. Because he participated in so many fights, C Chulainn should be remembered as a valiant warrior by a great number of people. Cuchulainn was the protector of Ulster, and even today, he is considered to be the most well-known folk hero in all of Ireland. His deeds were valiant; yet, as indicated before, Cuchulainn was not able to recognize the goddess of battle, which ultimately led to his death. Many people know him as a warrior who gained his skills by training in Ireland and Scotland and went on to become one of the most formidable competitors of his era. Imagine him as Ireland’s version of the Greek hero Achilles.

Cailleach – the veiled One

Cailleach was also known as the Hag of Béara, and she possessed a really amazing power, which was the ability to control the weather as well as the seasons. Her legend is connected to the regions of Cork and Kerry, where she is said to have lived when she was one of the most powerful and oldest mythological entities in Ireland. According to the folklore, Cailleach took the shape of an elderly woman and was responsible for the development of several mountain landmarks in Ireland, including the Cliffs of Moher and Hag’s Head.

Cernunnos – the god of wild things…

Cernunnos is revered by a large number of people as the “god of wild creatures.” He was frequently considered to be the embodiment of nature. Julius Caesar linked the Celtic god Cernunnos with the Roman god Dis Pater, who represented the underworld.

Cernunnos was a horned god who was connected to nature, grain, riches, and creatures that had horns. Julius Caesar linked this fabled figure with the Roman god of the underworld, Dis Pater, and the Druids referred to him as the Honored God. Cernunnos held a reverence for a great variety of creatures, including horned serpents, bulls, stags, and ran. The fact that he is shown in ancient Celtic art as sitting nude in the lotus pose with either horns or antlers perched on his head is an interesting fact.

Aengus – the romantic…

The river goddess Bionn gave birth to Aengus, who was the son of the Dagda. He was the all-powerful deity of youth and love, and he was also known by the names Angus and Oengus of the Bruig. The tale of Aengus tells us how he traveled the length and breadth of the land in quest of a lovely young woman. He was fortunate enough to find one, and he decided to call her Caer. Since she was destined to become a swan along with the other 150 maidens, Aengus made the decision to change into a swan himself so that he may be united with the woman who had been the love of his life.

Medb Queen of Connacht

In Celtic legend, Medb, sometimes known as Maeve, was the queen of Connacht and the ruler of the western part of Ireland. As a powerful leader, she eventually came to govern a large portion of the island, and she frequently came into confrontation with the legendary hero of Ulster, Cu Chulainn.

Medb had a large number of partners, and she expected the same three things from each of her marriages and suitors. These were the fact that they do not feel fear, animosity, or jealousy toward her in any way. She was worshiped as a deity representing absolute power.

Eriu or Eire – the goddess of Ireland

It was impossible to compile a list of ancient Celtic gods and goddesses without including Eire, who is the personification of Ireland. After the Tuatha Dé Danann’s victory against the Milesians, Eire and her two sisters traveled to meet the victors, which is one of the reasons why Eire has come to represent their heritage. In exchange, they proposed to honor her by naming a nation after her.

Who are the best-known Celtic Mythology Gods?

Although there are a great number of gods and goddesses that are well known, DagdaBrigid, and Queen Mebh are probably the gods and goddesses that are the most well-known in modern times. In our expert opinion, the best-known Celtic Gods are as follows.

  • Brigid
  • Queen Mebh
  • Lugh
  • Badb
  • Dagda

Is there a Celtic Gods and Goddesses list?

  • Brigid
  • The Cailleach
  • Aengus
  • Queen Medb
  • Cernunnos
  • Cu Chulainn
  • The Morrigan
  • Badb
  • Lugh
  • Danu
  • Dagda

Who were the Tuatha de Dannan?

In Irish mythology, the Tuatha dé Dannan were a magical race of people who lived in Ireland before any of our Irish ancestors ever came to the island. This is according to the legends that have been passed down from generation to generation. According to the urban legend on the googleeeeeeeee, the progenitors of the magical race are said to be alive and well now in the shape of fantastic creatures.

The Meanings Behind Some Common Irish Proverbs

The art of storytelling as well as the Irish language has a long and storied history in the country of Ireland. The best example of this is seen in Irish proverbs and their meaning. This is the result of a confluence of events, the first of which is that our one-of-a-kind language, which was in use a very long time before the English language was developed, has demonstrated the significance of preserving one’s customs and culture.

Furthermore, prior to the invention of pen and paper, literacy, and television, the most popular form of entertainment in Ireland was the telling of stories. And last, the Irish people are known for their inherent sociability and friendliness, and they like nothing more than having a nice conversation.

Over the course of our lives, the confluence of all of these factors has resulted in a natural facility with language. Many of the most well-known authors in the history of the globe were of Irish descent; James Joyce and Oscar Wilde are just two particularly outstanding examples. Additionally, the Irish are credited with having coined a whole lexicon’s worth of idioms, Irish sayings, and Irish proverbs. If there is one thing that humans are particularly skilled at, it is the ability to devise the ideal proverb to fit any given circumstance.

Even though they are hundreds of years old, many of them are as relevant as ever today. Others appear to be more archaic and antiquated when contrasted with contemporary culture, and of course, there are those that just don’t make much sense regardless of the period in which they are spoken or the circumstances around them!

Irish Proverb Affirmation Bracelets

The following is a collection of our favorite old Irish proverbs. There’s a saying for every situation! Our Irish Proverb Affirmation Bracelets are inspirational. Live the Celtic life you have created. Live the life you love, and inspire the relationships and friendships that you cherish. Do what you are passionate about and practice what you preach. The life of the Irish is to be enjoyed, not endured. And these truthful short and pithy Irish sayings are the proof. So, follow your Celtic spirit and dreams, be open to new beginnings, and live life the way you love.

Irish Proverbs

  • Two thirds of help is to give courage – Irish Proverb – means words of inspiration can go far.
  • The best horse doesn’t always win the race – Irish Proverb – means a horse with conditions to suit the day will always be the most likely winner.
  • It’s easy to half the potato where there is love – Irish Proverb – means when you are in love you will share everything together.
  • It takes time to build castles – Irish Proverb  – means hard work and planning will reap rewards eventually.
  • No man is wise at all times – Irish Proverb – means everyone makes mistakes
  • Fierceness is often hidden under beauty – Irish Proverb – means don’t let looks deceive you.
  • May hinges of our friendship never go rusty – Irish Proverb – means may your bonds of friendship never break.
  • If God shuts one door he opens another – Irish Proverb – means that if one thing you do fails, you will soon have an opportunity to try to succeed at something else.
  • Idleness is the desire of a fool – Irish Proverb – means knowing the right thing to do and failing to do it persistently.
  • Wisdom exceeds strength – Irish Proverb – means a wise man is strong. A man of knowledge gains in strength.
  • Patience can conquer destiny – Irish Proverb – means good things come to those who wait.
  • If you don’t know the way walk slowly – Irish Proverb – means keep pushing towards your goal, one day, you will achieve it. 

The Book of Kells: Everything You Need to Know

Ireland’s Republic of Ireland’s County Meath has the little town of Kells. The four New Testament gospels are included in the Book of Kells, also known as the Book of Columba, along with additional manuscripts.

The book’s uniqueness comes from the fact that it is an illuminated manuscript with intricate graphics and pictures that are thought to have been created around the year 800 AD.

Although it is not Irish writing, the illuminated manuscript known as the Book of Kells is recognized as a priceless piece of Irish history and may be found in Dublin, Ireland’s Trinity College Library.

ORIGIN OF THE ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT CALLED THE BOOK OF KELLS

While it is generally agreed that the monks of St. Columba were responsible for producing the Book of Kells, there is great disagreement as to where exactly they did it. It is thought that it was written by Celtic monks at the monastery’s scriptorium on the island of Iona, part of the Mull chain in western Scotland. Saint Columcille of Donegal established this monastery.

The Lindisfarne Gospels were written in Iona around 700 AD, and the Book of Kells’ design resembles those works, suggesting that Iona rather than Kells was where it was written. Viking invasions of coastal monasteries were a possibility around the start of the ninth century. The majority of this book is said to have been written on Iona and carried back to the Abbey of Kells for preservation.

The relics of Columcille have reportedly transported to Kells from his home County Donegal in the year 1090 AD, according to the Annals of Tigernach, another ancient Irish chronicle.

Two gospels were found among these artifacts, one of which was presumably the Book of Kells. The Book of Durrow is supposed to have been the second gospel. The church at Kells was destroyed in 1641 as a result of an Irish uprising. The English governor of Kells sent the book to Dublin for storage sometime around 1653.

A few years later, Henry Jones, a former soldier in Cromwell’s army, is said to have helped bring the Book of Kells to Trinity CollegeThe Long Room of the Old Library at Trinity College is where you may discover this masterpiece today in Dublin, Ireland. The 340 folios or leaves, each made of calfskin vellum, are bound together in a book that is around thirteen inches broad and ten inches thick. Although this might look substantial, the original was significantly bigger. But over time, thirty folios were lost, and even the ones that were still there had to be reduced for upkeep and rebinding.

Why Was the Book of Kells Created?

The book’s purpose was more ceremonial than practical, despite binding the gospels’ material together. It wasn’t intended to be read during mass. The creation and presentation of the material within the book itself are one of the main justifications for this notion. The text itself is haphazardly scrawled and scattered throughout the pages, in contrast to the carefully thought out and executed images and illustrations.

There is word and paragraph duplication, the omission of crucial phrases, and a lack of attempt to fix these serious mistakes. This book was admired for its decorations and exquisite pictures, not for its content.

The book’s authors appear to prefer the artwork and illustrations above the readings. In a nutshell, the appearance and aesthetics of the book took precedence over its practical utility.

What is the Vulgate?

The fourth-century Latin Vulgate is a translation of the Bible. According to legend, the gospels of the new testament were transferred directly from the Vulgate into the Book of Kells. However, as was already said, the scribes’ compositions were erratic and haphazard. There is the suggestion that they relied on their own memory of what they had previously read rather than copying their lines verbatim from the Vulgate.

The book has additional material in addition to the text, and each page of prose is accompanied by an image. These images feature meticulous details and vivid hues such, among others, purple, pink, green, and yellow.

The Book has Irish-Celtic themes and initials that were influenced by the Hiberno-Saxon style of the 7th century. Along with this, there is also the Anglo-Saxon custom of vibrant color and upbeat compositions. What distinguishes the book are its intricate designs and exquisite craftsmanship.

The illuminations are also another striking element of the book. They span 10 full pages and show small images of evangelical symbols. Some of these portrayals have survived.

The canon tables are given their own elaborately decorated pages in the Book of Kells, which may be found in Ireland. You will discover the emblems that represent each of the four evangelists, with Matthew being shown as a Man, Mark being represented by the Lion, Luke being linked to the Calf, and John being given the Eagle as his emblem.

Additionally discovered are the introductory passages of each of the Gospels. Breves causae are the names given to these condensed versions of the gospel tales. The Vulgate, which was finished by Saint Jerome in 384 AD, serves as the basis for this work, which is written in Latin and is dedicated to the four Gospels. There is also a picture of Christ, in addition to creative depictions of the Virgin Mary and the Christ Child.

The Book of Kells is Written on Vellum

Vellum, which was made from the skins of around 185 animals, was used rather than paper for the writing in the Book of Kells. The monks who lived in Ireland’s monasteries managed large herds of cattle not just to supply milk and food for themselves, but also as a source of vellum, which was the principal writing medium that the monks used. Following the hand stitching that was used to bind the vellum pages together, a protective cover was created out of either leather or wood.

The text of the book is written in an italicized script that is referred to as “insular majuscule.” The intricate knotwork and links that can be found in the images are well-known for the complexity of their design and the attention to detail that went into creating them. It is likely that the book was initially kept in a shrine, which is a jewel-encrusted casing made of gold that is used to contain treasures. Around the year 1000 A.D., the volumes were taken by thieves. It had been buried beneath the ground when it was discovered, but the priceless holder it had been holding was never found.

During the nineteenth century, the book went through a process called “rebinding,” during which the page margins were, regrettably, trimmed and gilded. In 1953, the book underwent yet another rebinding, which resulted in the creation of four distinct volumes. This was done with the intention of assisting in the preservation of its magnificent and rare pages. Two of the four volumes are currently on exhibit at Trinity College in Dublin, where they will remain there indefinitely. The first book has pages of text, whereas the second volume is solely dedicated to displaying illustrations on its pages.

The Book of Kells is an Irish Treasure

The Book of Kells was the most valuable artifact in all of medieval Europe. The Book of Kells is a stunning example of Irish artwork and is considered to be a national treasure. Each year, hundreds of people travel to the Trinity College Library in Dublin in the hope of catching a sight of the two volumes that are kept on exhibit there.

St. Brigid Blessings and Prayers

Saint Brigid’s cross made from straw stuck in window and blessed the house and protected it from fire and evil. Concept: religion, irish, traditional

A Traditional St. Brigid Blessing

Our wonderful Brigid’s Crosses were inspired by this beautiful heritage, imitating the delicate woven pattern of rushes in precious metals such as silver and gold. Also known as Bride, Bridget of Ireland, Bride of the Isles, and Mary of the Gael, she now reigns as one of the most recognized saints in Ireland.

May the blessing of God and the Trinity be on this cross and where it sits, and on everyone who looks at it,” is a customary blessing for St. Brigid Cross.

About the Brigid’s Cross

Brigid’s cross, like the shamrock and the harp, is a wonderful Irish symbol that may be traced back to Celtic folklore. The cross is weaved from left to right, following the position of the sun, on January 31st, the eve of St. Brigid’s day. It features a layered square in the middle and four arms extending out from it, each knotted at the ends.

St. Brigid’s Feast Day

St. Brigid’s Day is February 1st and traditionally the start of Spring in Ireland.

Prayer to St. Brigid

Dear St. Brigid, brilliant star of sanctity in the early days of our Irish faith and love for the omnipotent God Who has never forsaken us, we look up to you now in earnest, hopeful prayer. By your glorious sacrifice of earthly riches, joys and affections obtain for us grace to “seek first the Kingdom of God and His justice” with constant trust in His fatherly care. By your life of laborious charity to the poor, the sick, the many seekers for light and comfort, obtain for us grace to be God’s helpers to the utmost of our power during our stay on earth, looking forward, as you did, to our life with Him during eternity. By the sanctified peace of your death-bed, obtain for us that we may receive the fullness of pardon and peace when the hour comes that will summon us to the judgment seat of our just and most merciful Lord. Amen.

Published by The Irish Jewelry Company

We at The Irish Jewelry Company take pride in making the Irish gift giving experience modern and convenient. The Irish Jewelry Company celebrates their Celtic heritage and a love of Ireland through original Irish Jewelry design. Their beautiful Irish jewelry is steeped in Celtic symbolism and rich in Irish tradition. View all posts by The Irish Jewelry Company

Shamrocks: A Symbol of Ireland

WHAT IS THE MEANING OF THE SHAMROCK?

The Meaning of the Irish Shamrock, the symbol of Ireland. The word shamrock comes from the Old Irish “seamróg”, which can be translated as “little clover”. The Irish word for clover is “seamair”, and óg means “young” or “little”.

What is the difference between a shamrock and a clover?

The shamrock and the clover plants are often confused. Shamrocks are in fact a species of the clover plant.The shamrock is most common 3-leaf clover native to the beautiful Emerald Isle. A clover must have three leaves to be considered a shamrock. If the clover has more or less, then it is not a shamrock.

Why is the shamrock a symbol of Ireland?

The majestic shamrock that adorn Irish jewelry today was chosen as the national symbol of Ireland because Saint Patrick used the 3 leafed clover to teach the Holy Trinity to the pagan Celts. The Celts understood the significance of the shamrock forming a triad because they believed three was a mystical number. The Trinity is the idea that God is really three-in-one: The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit. The word shamrock can be traced back to the Irish word seamróg or seamair óg, meaning “little clover”. The tradition of wearing a Shamrock on Saint Patrick’s Day can be traced back to the early 1700s. The Irish have long considered shamrocks as good-luck symbols and today people of many other nationalities also believe they bring good luck. Shamrock jewelry has gained in popularity in recent times.  In Ireland shamrocks and shamrock jewelry are traditionally worn at weddings for good luck. Often tucked in a bouquet or used as filler with a boutineer.

What is the meaning of a 4 Leaf Clover?

According to Irish lore, each leaf represents: Love, Respect, Wealth, and Health. To find a four-leaf clover is a rare thing making it very lucky  to find.

Shamrock Necklaces Popularized in Irish Jewelry

Erin Go Bragh Pendant and the Irish Hard Pendant by The Irish Jewelry Company

Shamrock necklaces, inspired by Ireland’s national symbol. Get the Luck of the Irish with a traditional shamrock pendant! The shamrock is believed to bring good luck and not just to the Irish. In Ireland shamrocks are traditionally worn at weddings for good luck. Brides sometimes pin a shamrock charm to their bouquet.

About us: The Irish Jewelry Company was founded by award-winning designer Jennifer Derrig.  The Irish Jewelry Company collection offers classic and contemporary Irish Jewelry including Claddagh rings, all handcrafted.

Explore The Irish Jewelry Company Claddagh ring collection today and start your own Irish tradition today.

Saint Patrick’s Day History and Tradition

As that old saying goes “Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day“. Saint Patrick’s Day is one of the most popular Irish holidays celebrated world wide by the Irish and non Irish a like. Saint Patrick’s Day is actually the Feast day of Ireland’s patron saint known as Saint Patrick (Irish: Lá Fhéile Pádraig, also widely known as “the Day of the Festival of Patrick”). St. Patrick’s Day for the Irish is a popular cultural celebration as well as a religious celebration held on 17 March.  The feast day of St. Patrick is the traditional death date of Saint Patrick (c. AD 385–461). Saint Patrick is the foremost patron saint of Ireland.

Who was Saint Patrick? 

Saint Patrick was a Christian missionary and is regarded as the patron saint of Ireland. St. Patrick lived from AD 373–493, and ministered mostly in Northern Ireland from AD 433 until his death. Irish legend credits Patrick with banishing snakes from the island of Ireland although Ireland never actually had snakes. Let’s just chalk that up to some poetic license. It has however been suggested that snakes referred to the serpent symbolism of the pagans also called the Druids. Saint Patrick is also credited with teaching the Irish about the Holy Trinity by showing people the shamrock and a three-leaved clover. Legend also says St. Patrick, while preaching Christianity, drew a cross through a Celtic circle symbolic of the moon Goddess. Hence the Celtic cross was born. Today the circle of the cross is viewed as a of God’s endless love.

New York City’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Irish-American immigrants brought Saint Patrick’s Day to the United States. The first civic and public celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day took place in Boston, Massachusetts in 1737. The first celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day in New York City was held at the Crown and Thistle Tavern in 1756. Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated by Irish and non-Irish alike. Regardless of ethnic background, everyone wears green-colored clothing and items. Traditionally, those who are caught not wearing green are pinched. The NYC St. Patrick’s Day parade has become the largest Saint Patrick’s Day parade in the world, outside Ireland. In 2006 more than 150,000 marchers participated in it, including Irish bands, Irish firefighters, Irish military and Irish police groups, county associations, Irish emigrant societies, Emerald Societies, and social and Irish cultural clubs, and it was watched by close to two million spectators lining the streets.

Why do we wear green on St Patrick’s Day?

Old Irish folklore says that wearing green makes one invisible to mischievous creatures like leprechauns, fairies who pinch those not wearing the green.  As a matter of superstition people began pinching anyone not wear green as a reminder that leprechauns were lurking about.

The origin of the “wearing of the green” dress code for St Patrick’s Day dates can be dated to the 1798 Irish Rebellion, the major uprising against the British in Ireland. It was during this rebellion when the shamrock, a three leaf clover became a symbol of Irish nationalism.

Today many people adorn themselves with lucky shamrock jewelry on St. Patrick’s Day. Saint Patrick’s Day jewelry such as Shamrock jewelry including shamrock earrings, and an Irish necklace like a shamrock necklace makes the perfect Irish accessory for the festive holiday.

Another symbol of Irish pride worn on St. Patrick’s Day is the Irish Harp. Irish harps are worn as Irish harp brooches and Irish harp necklaces. The Irish harp, although not as renowned as the shamrock is the official emblem of Ireland. TheIrish harps status as the official insignia of Ireland dates centuries and the elegant instrument’s history tells much about the history of the Emerald Isle.

Five Most Admired Irish Symbols in Jewelry Loved Worldwide

The Irish Jewelry Company Collection

Irish jewelry is steeped in Irish tradition and Celtic symbolism. It is full of mysticism and deep spiritual meaning, representing love, life cycles and faith.  Irish symbols in Irish jewelry can be traced back directly folklore’s told through the centuries and ancient Celtic manuscript drawings. The popularity of Irish jewelry around the world has really taken off in recent years as many people taken an interest in the deeper meaning of talismans, objects of faith and symbols of life.  Irish jewelry isn’t just for the Irish anymore.

The Celtic Tree of Life

The Celtic Tree of Life meaning varies. Rebirth is one of the most popular meanings for the Tree of Life.  The belief stems from theory that trees experiences renewal throughout the changing of the seasons. Its leaves fall in autumn and regrow in spring is symbolic of rebirth. Another meaning of the Celtic Tree of Life is that it is also a symbol of wisdom and strength. The most sacred of trees was the oak, called ‘daur’ in Celtic. It is where the modern word ‘door’ is derived. So, the oak tree, literally would have been the door to the other world.

Celtic Cross Meaning

The Celtic cross is a cross with equal rays, enclosed in a circle. The rays can slightly protrude outside the circle. Sometimes a Celtic ornament is located along the cross and in a circle. Although this form of the cross is inherent in many ancient peoples, including the Slavs, the cross in a circle is firmly established in the minds of people as Celtic.

The Christian interpretation of the cross is simple: the circle means eternity and union, and the cross itself means the love and sacrifice. It is difficult to say how the ancient Celts themselves interpreted this symbol: there is no information about this. But historians suggest that the cross as understood by the ancient Celts could symbolize fertility, abundance, and protection. It is also called the solar symbol because its facets suggest the unity of earth, air, sun and water.

Nowadays, the  Celtic cross is worn by both Christians and pagans: it is not tied to a particular religion, and different denominations perceive it as a symbol of their spiritual views.

Claddagh Ring

The Claddagh Ring is a legendary jewelry item that epitomizes timeless values. The legacy design cues hands on either side of a heart and a crown on top. The classic Claddagh ring shows the wearer’s family situation. Thus, a heart looking out the fingertips means you are single, whereas this element pointing towards the wrist means that the owner is taken. Claddagh rings symbolize friendship, love and loyalty.

Today, this ring has a huge number of design variations, but the main three elements have remained intact. This jewelry item is presented to girls and women as a symbol of companionship or as a Claddagh engagement ring.

Trinity Knot also Known as the Irish Love Knot  

The Celtic love knot is a modern-day Irish tradition. Also know as the trinity knot, it is a religious symbol with both pagan and Christians heritage. In Celtic mythology, knots especially Celtic love knots symbolize the sacred geometry of the universe and being. It is customary to give a loved one a gift with the trinity knot, or Celtic Love Knot,  like a necklace or ring, to embody feelings of love.

Celtic Sisters Knot

The Celtic Sisters Knot is a symbol of sisterhood and the strong, eternal bond we share with our sisters and friends. … The stylized triquetra or triple spiral, a sister symbol woven within the Celtic Sisters Knot heart symbolizes the three stages of woman.

Where are you and your sisters on the spiral of life? Celebrate the powerful, lifelong bond of friendship between women with a symbol for sisters. One day we will all be in some part of all 3 stages of life. First, the youth of our childhood. Second, the mothering spirit of our years. Third, our wisdom that we pass on to the new generation of women. We may not all be related, but we all share a bond of love, compassion, and perseverance. There are few symbols for sisters like the Celtic Sisters Knot that captive the soul and beauty of sisterhood.

The Celtic Tree of Life Symbolism and Meaning

The Celtic Tree of Life

In Celtic myth, trees played a central role in daily life. The Celts believed the Irish wooded landscape was full of spirits. They also associated the spirit or heart of the great oak with fertility and centered with wisdom. Often Celtic clans gathered socially underneath the mighty oak to discussing clan issues like a meeting of public officials today. Like Native Americans the Celts revered nature and the cycle of life. They valued their relationship to the earth and gathered within nature in honor of it instead of building great temples of stone. The Celts love of nature and its bond to the earth lead to their many beliefs revolving around trees.

What does the Celtic Tree of Life Symbolize?

The commemorated oak tree also called the Celtic Tree of Life has been an ancient symbol of life, fertility and wisdom revered by many cultures like the Greeks, and Romans in addition to the Celts since ancient times. There are many symbols of the oak tree with spiritual meaning.

Tree of Life in Gaelic

The Celtic tree of life in Gaelic is called “Crann Bethadh”. The Tree of Life is a complex element of Irish culture and customs. The Celtic Tree of Life is amongst one of the most admired and recognizable Celtic symbols. The tree of life symbolically important in both history and religion. It symbolizes faith, the strength of coherence and stability.

The Meaning of the Celtic Tree of Life

The Celtic Tree of Life meaning varies. Rebirth is one of the most popular meanings for the Tree of Life.  The belief stems from theory that trees experiences renewal throughout the changing of the seasons. Its leaves fall in autumn and regrow in spring is symbolic of rebirth. Another meaning of the Celtic Tree of Life is that it is also a symbol of wisdom and strength. The most sacred of trees was the oak, called ‘daur’ in Celtic.  It is where the modern word ‘door’ is derived. So, the oak tree, literally would have been the door to the other world.

The Celtic Tree of Life has been an inspiration to various artists for centuries. Remember that great scene in Game of Thrones. The one where Bran, Hodor and Elllie are in the cave root system of the weirwood tree when Bran was becoming the Three-Eyed Raven?  I believe it was kind of symbolic of the tree of life, the all-knowing tree. Remember then while they were escaping the cave root system, Ellie shouted to Hodor to “hold the door to give them a chance to escape. The words flashed back to the past, causing Wylis to fall to the ground seizing while yelling “hold the door!” repeatable, until brain damage set in and the phrased “Hold Door” slurred into one: “Hodor.” Are you seeing the connection?  

Knowledge of the fundamental meaning of the Tree of Life symbol gives an insight to ancient Celtic. Celtic Tree of Life Knot has roots and branches woven into a Celtic knot together without end, illustrating the uninterrupted cycle of life on earth. The Celtic Tree of Life knot is a popular design for tapestries, throws, Celtic jewelry and tree of life tattoos because of its positive energy.

Six Fascinating Mythical Celtic Women of Irish Folklore

Mysterious Celtic woman

Ancient Irish folklore has many stories of beautiful and strong Irish women of the past. Celtic women have often been depicted as holding positions of great importance, highly valued in a very male dominated Celtic tribal society. Irish women have been venerated as a goddess, saint, as a warrior even royalty and at the same time they have been portrayed as someone to fear. I am sure the truth about ancient Irish women in Irish mythology lies somewhere between fantasy and reality.   

Grace O’Malley, the 16th Century Pirate Queen of Ireland…

Grace O’Malley was born in Ireland in around 1530. She was the daughter of Owen O’Malley. O’Malley was a wealthy nobleman and sea trader. When O’Malley died Grace inherited his large shipping and trading business. Grace O’Malley commanded a dozen ships and thousands of men. Grace’s vast empire of ships stretched from Connaught on the Irish coast to Africa. Through the daring of her piracy, Grace nearly bankrupted the English treasury-and her outright defiance brought embarrassment to Queen Elizabeth I.

International Talk Like a Pirate Day or ITLAPD is on September 19. It is a parodic holiday created in 1995 by John Baur (Ol’ Chumbucket) and Mark Summers (Cap’n Slappy), of Albany, Oregon, U.S. Remember Grace O’Malley on September 19th, International Talk Like a Pirate Day and give her an Arghhhh!

Aoife, the Wife of King Lir and the Children of Lir….

The Children of Lir… Long ago there lived a King named Lir who lived with his four children, Fionnuale, Aodh, Fiachra and Conn and his beloved wife who would son die. After grieving for his wife King Lir married Aoife. Aoife was very jealous of King Lir’s love for his four children. She used her magic to turn the children into swans. As swans they were condemned to spend 300 years at Lough Derravaragh, 300 years at the Sea of Moye and 300 years on the waters of Irrus Domann. The only way to break the spell was a blessing from a monk. Finally, after 900 years of suffering they heard church bells and returned to shore. There the spell was finally broke by St. Patrick. Unfortunately, they were so old they died soon after the spell was broken and joined their parents in heaven. The story of the Children of Lir is one about the strength of the parental child bond.

The Legendary Irish Princess Isolde …

The Irish princess, Iseult of Ireland (also Iseult La Belle or Iseult la Blonde, “Iseult the Fair”), is the daughter of King Anguish of Ireland and Queen Iseult the Elder. She is a main character in the Tristan poems of Béroul, Thomas of Britain, and Gottfried von Strassburg and in the opera Tristan und Isolde by Richard Wagner. Iseult is first seen as a young Irish princess who heals Tristan from his wounds.

According to Arthurian legend, Iseult (also “Isolde”) was the adulterous lover of Sir Tristan. Sir Tristan was a handsome Knight of the Round Table. Iseult was an Irish Princess who fell hopelessly in love with Tristan. But Sir Tristan was sent on behalf the King of Cornwall to win Iseult’s hand in marriage for King Mark of Cornwall. This romantic tragedy was used as the basis of “Tristan and Isolde” by Richard Wagner, an acclaimed opera.

The Banshee …

The Banshee, bean-sidhe (woman of the fairy may be an ancestral spirit appointed to forewarn members of certain ancient Irish families of their time of death. According to tradition, the banshee can only cry for five major Irish families: the O’Neills, the O’Briens, the O’Connors, the O’Gradys and the Kavanaghs. Intermarriage has since extended this select list.


Whatever her origins, the banshee chiefly appears in one of three guises: a young woman, a stately matron, or a raddled old hag. These represent the triple aspects of the Celtic goddess of war and death, namely Badhbh, Macha and Mor-Rioghain.) She usually wears either a grey, hooded cloak or the winding sheet or grave robe of the unshriven dead. She may also appear as a washerwoman and is seen apparently washing the blood-stained clothes of those who are about to die. In this guise she is known as the bean-nighe (washing woman).
Although not always seen, her mourning call is heard, usually at night when someone is about to die.

Saint Brigid – The Patron Saint of Ireland …

Saint Brigid was born Brigit, and shares her name with a Celtic goddess from whom many legends and folk customs are associated. St. Brigid, also known as “Mary of the Gael“, is a patroness Saint of Ireland. Born the daughter of a powerful Irish Chieftain St. Bridget or also spelled Brigid became a nun completely devoted to relieving the misery and hardship of the poor.

The Saint Brigid’s Cross

The traditional woven cross is said to have originated during a visit St. Bridget made to a dying Chieftain in which she wove it from rushes on the floor to show the significance of Christian faith. The woven rush cross has become synonymous with St. Bridget known as the Saint Brigid’s Cross.

Saint Brigid is also the Patron Saint of the LAOH. The LAOH stand for THE LADIES ANCIENT ORDER OF HIBERNIANS. The Ancient Order of Hibernians is an Irish order, and it was organized in The United States of America in New York City in the year of 1836. Her feast day, known as St. Brigid’s day is February first.

Celtic Goddess Brigid…

The Celtic Goddess Brigid is an Irish goddess of spring, dating back to pre- Christian Ireland.  She is a venerated deity whose name means exalted one derived from ancient Gaelic word brig.  Her name is also said as Brighid or Brighit. Brigid is the daughter of the Dagda, and therefore one of the Tuatha de Dannan. The Tuatha Dé Danann, the people of the Goddess Danu, also known by the earlier name Tuath Dé “tribe of the gods”, were one of the great ancient tribes of Ireland. She is known as the Goddess of Healers, Poets, Smiths, Childbirth, and is the Inspiration for the Goddess of Fire and Hearth and a patron of warfare or Briga. Brigid said to be gentle, yet she is extraordinarily strong and stern.  

The History and Origins of Celtic Jewelry

Historians believe Celtic clans first settled in Germany and Austria from near 1,200BC. The clans were a society of agriculturalists and soldiers. It is believed around the time of the 4th and 3rd centuries BC, the Celts migrated south across France and to the Iberian Peninsula. It was around 500BC when the Celts first arrived in Britain and Ireland. Over hundreds of years the Celts spread throughout the Ireland’s countryside. In the fifth century by the time Christianity came to Ireland the Celtic language, traditions and culture were the dominant force in Ireland.

Men’s Celtic Jewelry Collection by The Irish Jewelry Company

Celtic Art of The La Tene Period

With the Celtic language and culture flourishing in Ireland their style of artwork would soon take hold in Irish culture as well.  Celtic artists started to demonstrate a more advanced type of artwork. The Celtic form of art during this time is called the La Tene style[JD1] .  Named after the town of La Tène in Switzerland. The Celtic art called La Tène is characterized by curves and spirals. There is little Representative art of the human seen. The style is more defined by abstract geometric design such as the Celtic knot and the common triple spiral design known as the triskelion or triskele.

Celtic Knots are a popular Celtic symbol but there are many types of Celtic Knots. Celtic knots are like circles and loops interwoven with no beginning or end. A symbol of eternity and the cycle of life. Celtic symbols are widely popular in Celtic Tattoos and in Celtic Jewelry. Celtic symbols have a variety of Celtic Knot meanings representing family, strength, protection, love and more.

While the exact origins of Celtic Knots are lost to time historians believe these Celtic symbols date to around 500 BC. Celtic knots have been found carved into ancient Celtic architecture, art and in illuminated manuscripts.  Celtic Jewelry is thought to date back to around 2000 BC to around 550 AD. This was the period in which historian believe Celtic craftsman began using silver and gold to craft beautiful Celtic jewelry adorned with Celtic symbols and knots. The exact meaning of the Celtic knot has unfortunately been lost in through the centuries and are left to interpretation.

Common styles of Celtic jewelry during this time included torcs, likely worn as a status symbol since they considered jewelry to be decorative rather than practical. Another type of Celtic jewelry found with torcs during this period is the Celtic cloak brooch. The famous and impressive Tara Brooch made of silver-gilt and decorated with fine filigree interlaced design. The Tara Brooch is a magnificent Celtic cloak brooch. This style of Celtic brooch is repeated throughout Celtic jewelry.

Celtic knotwork designs are embossed on large Celtic stone crosses all over Ireland that have with stood the test of time and are depicted in metal work and Celtic jewelry on ancient riches like the Ardagh Chalice part of the Ardagh Hoard on display at National Museum of Archaeology in Ireland in Dublin along with the famous Tara brooch.

Celtic Jewelry is so highly sought after and admired throughout the world. Tourists to Ireland often wonder about the local crafts the country is famous for creating. Ireland is famous for a variety of crafts including wool sweaters and its famous world-renowned Celtic Jewelry.

What jewelry is Ireland known for?

Ireland is known for beautiful Celtic Jewelry inspired by the ancient Celtic philosophy . Celtic jewelry is steeped in culture from Ireland with symbols of love, family, faith, and friendship passed for generations. Celtic jewelry has timeless appeal and is a wonderful representation of the vibrant Irish culture and people.

Celtic jewelry is high quality and handcrafted inspired by all things Irish and made from the finest material by expert Irish jewelers. When a customer buys a piece of Celtic jewelry such as a Claddagh Ring, or Celtic Trinity Knot they are not only getting a beautiful piece of jewelry they are also passing on traditional Celtic culture and custom.