Flaunt your Irish Pride with Saint Patrick’s Day Jewelry

Saint Patrick’s Day is the time-honored Irish holiday always celebrated on March 17th.

The luck of the Irish is always celebrated on St. Patrick’s Day that has become a global celebration of Irish culture usually celebrated with parades and pub gatherings. On St. Patrick’s Day many people of Irish decent flaunt there best Irish jewelry proudly. Adding a beautiful piece of Irish jewelry, like a claddagh ring, emerald green shamrock earrings or Harp Brooch to your St. Patrick’s Day look adds the perfect festive finishing touch. Luckily, there’s still time to get your perfect Irish gift a piece of St. Patrick’s Day jewelry in time for March 17th. Your local St. Patrick’s Day parade might be canceled in 2021 but your Irish spirit has not been. So treat yourself to a special piece of Irish jewelry to lift your spirits or give an Irish gift of jewelry, a unique present for a special someone who can use a little Irish luck. 

The Claddagh Ring Means Friendship, Love and Loyalty

The Claddagh Ring, arguably the most versatile piece of Irish jewelry is world renowned, and are worn by both men and women, single or taken. Irish Claddagh rings are named for the ancient fishing village of Claddagh, near Galway, Ireland, dating back to the 17th century. The Claddagh ring in Irish is fáinne Chladaigh and is a traditional Irish ring which represents love, loyalty, and friendship. The hands represent friendship, the heart represents love, and the crown represents loyalty. The Irish Claddagh ring, as currently known, was first produced in the 17th century.

The Shamrock, the symbol of Ireland.

The majestic shamrock was chosen as the national symbol of Ireland because Saint Patrick used the 3 leafed clover to teach the Holy Trinity to the pagan Celts. The Celts understood the significance of the shamrock forming a triad because they believed three was a mystical number. The Trinity is the idea that God is really three-in-one: The Father, The Son and The Holy Spirit. The word shamrock can be traced back to the Irish word seamróg or seamair óg, meaning “little clover”. The tradition of wearing a Shamrock on Saint Patrick’s Day can be traced back to the early 1700s. The Irish have long considered shamrocks as good-luck symbols and today people of many other nationalities also believe they bring good luck. Shamrock jewelry has gained in popularity in recent times.  In Ireland shamrocks and shamrock jewelry are traditionally worn at weddings for good luck. Often tucked in a bouquet or used as filler with a boutonniere. Today lucky Irish shamrock jewelry is available in a wide select of shamrock earrings, shamrock brooch,  shamrock necklaces and shamrock rings.

What is the Irish Harp?

The Irish harp is a political symbol of Ireland. for centuries. The exact origin of the Irish Harp is really known. The Irish Harp is a symbol of Ireland and Irish pride. The Irish harp became an emblem of resistance to the Crown and England. The Irish harp, although not as renowned as the shamrock is the official emblem of Ireland. The Irish harp status as the official insignia of Ireland dates centuries and the elegant instrument’s history talks much about the history of the Emerald Isle. Our elegant Irish Harp Brooch and Irish Harp Necklace accented by brilliant gold shamrocks is a noteworthy piece of Irish jewelry.

About us: The Irish Jewelry Company was founded by award-winning designer Jennifer Derrig.  The Irish Jewelry Company Claddagh collection offers classic and contemporary Claddagh rings, all handcrafted.

Explore The Irish Jewelry Company Claddagh ring collection today and start your own Irish tradition today.

Saint Patrick’s Day History and Tradition

As that old saying goes “Everyone is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day“. Saint Patrick’s Day is one of the most popular Irish holidays celebrated world wide by the Irish and non Irish a like. Saint Patrick’s Day is actually the Feast day of Ireland’s patron saint known as Saint Patrick (Irish: Lá Fhéile Pádraig, also widely known as “the Day of the Festival of Patrick”). St. Patrick’s Day for the Irish is a popular cultural celebration as well as a religious celebration held on 17 March.  The feast day of St. Patrick is the traditional death date of Saint Patrick (c. AD 385–461). Saint Patrick is the foremost patron saint of Ireland.

Who was Saint Patrick? 

Saint Patrick was a Christian missionary and is regarded as the patron saint of Ireland. St. Patrick lived from AD 373–493, and ministered mostly in Northern Ireland from AD 433 until his death. Irish legend credits Patrick with banishing snakes from the island of Ireland although Ireland never actually had snakes. Let’s just chalk that up to some poetic license. It has however been suggested that snakes referred to the serpent symbolism of the pagans also called the Druids. Saint Patrick is also credited with teaching the Irish about the Holy Trinity by showing people the shamrock and a three-leaved clover. Legend also says St. Patrick, while preaching Christianity, drew a cross through a Celtic circle symbolic of the moon Goddess. Hence the Celtic cross was born. Today the circle of the cross is viewed as a of God’s endless love.

New York City’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Irish-American immigrants brought Saint Patrick’s Day to the United States. The first civic and public celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day took place in Boston, Massachusetts in 1737. The first celebration of Saint Patrick’s Day in New York City was held at the Crown and Thistle Tavern in 1756. Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated by Irish and non-Irish alike. Regardless of ethnic background, everyone wears green-colored clothing and items. Traditionally, those who are caught not wearing green are pinched. The NYC St. Patrick’s Day parade has become the largest Saint Patrick’s Day parade in the world, outside Ireland. In 2006 more than 150,000 marchers participated in it, including Irish bands, Irish firefighters, Irish military and Irish police groups, county associations, Irish emigrant societies, Emerald Societies, and social and Irish cultural clubs, and it was watched by close to two million spectators lining the streets.

Why do we wear green on St Patrick’s Day?

Old Irish folklore says that wearing green makes one invisible to mischievous creatures like leprechauns, fairies who pinch those not wearing the green.  As a matter of superstition people began pinching anyone not wear green as a reminder that leprechauns were lurking about.

The origin of the “wearing of the green” dress code for St Patrick’s Day dates can be dated to the 1798 Irish Rebellion, the major uprising against the British in Ireland. It was during this rebellion when the shamrock, a three leaf clover became a symbol of Irish nationalism.

Today many people adorn themselves with lucky shamrock jewelry on St. Patrick’s Day. Saint Patrick’s Day jewelry such as Shamrock jewelry including shamrock earrings, and an Irish necklace like a shamrock necklace makes the perfect Irish accessory for the festive holiday.

Another symbol of Irish pride worn on St. Patrick’s Day is the Irish Harp. Irish harps are worn as Irish harp brooches and Irish harp necklaces. The Irish harp, although not as renowned as the shamrock is the official emblem of Ireland. TheIrish harps status as the official insignia of Ireland dates centuries and the elegant instrument’s history tells much about the history of the Emerald Isle.

St. Stephen’s Day, or the Feast of St. Stephen

St. Stephen’s Day, or the Feast of St. Stephen, is a Christian saint’s day to commemorate Saint Stephen, celebrated on 26 December in Ireland.

St. Stephen’s Day (Lá Fhéile Stiofáin), or the Day of the Wren (Lá an Dreoilín), is an occasion to commemorate the life of St Stephen, a Christian martyr. Most people in Ireland today spend the day quietly with close friends or family.

On “Wren’s Day”, in some areas of Ireland like Dingle, groups of musicians, figures dressed in straw suits and followers in fancy dress or st-stephens-day-green-goldparade-dingle-ireland+1152_13326480249-tpfil02aw-19422disguise can be seen moving about the streets and lanes “hunting the wren”.

During Penal Times there was once a plot in a village against the local soldiers. They were surrounded and were about to be ambushed when a group of wrens pecked on their drums and awakened the soldiers. The plot failed and the wren became known as ‘The Devil’s bird’.

On St. Stephens day a procession takes place where a pole with a holly bush is carried from house to house and families dress up in old clothes and with blackened faces. In olden times an actual wren would be killed and placed on top of the pole.
This custom has to a large degree disappeared but the tradition of visiting from house to house on St. Stephens Day has survived and is very much part of Christmas.

This custom has to a large degree disappeared but the tradition of visiting from house to house on St. Stephens Day has survived and is very much part of Christmas.

St. Stephen’s Day is a national holiday in Ireland, but, the celebrations have little connection to the Saint.